Garlic Fest will not be held in Delray Beach in 2017

Seventeenth Annual Delray Beach Garlic Festival Saturday January 30, 2016 at Old School Square in Delray Beach. (Bill Ingram / The Palm Beach Post)
Seventeenth Annual Delray Beach Garlic Festival Saturday January 30, 2016 at Old School Square in Delray Beach. (Bill Ingram / The Palm Beach Post)

Delray Beach’s long-running Garlic Fest will carry on — just not in Delray Beach.

Before the city commission had an opportunity to vote this evening on whether the garlic-themed festival would be held in the city’s downtown in 2017, as it has been done since 1999, the festival coordinator withdrew the application.

“Ironically, I must thank you all for not approving my event or our appeals,” said Nancy Stewart, the festival founder and coordinator. The event will move to another city, she said.

Stewart sought a waiver to keep the festival in Delray’s downtown despite a rule adopted by the city that allows for only one major event per month. The 18th annual Garlic Fest was planned for February 2017, the same month as the nationally televised Delray Beach Open tennis tournament, although the dates and locations did not overlap.

Garlic Fest was brought before the commission at a meeting in late June, when dozens of residents and local business owners spoke in favor of keeping Garlic Fest at Old School Square, where the festival has historically been held. The vote was deferred after a tie among commissioners, absent Mayor Cary Glickstein.

Following the meeting, nine other cities heard an “outpouring of support” from the community and offered to host Garlic Fest, Stewart said.

“We have narrowed it down to two cities,” she told commissioners. Stewart will make an announcement by next week with the new location and official dates of the festival.

Stewart said many concessions were made, such as excluding children’s rides and offering off-site parking, to appease the Delray Beach City Commission in an effort to keep the festival in the city.

Said Stewart: “It never felt right to us.”

Delray Beach Police: ‘Lock your doors’ after 108 car burglaries in June

(Contributed)
(Contributed)

“I can’t remember the last time we came even close to approaching 100 reported vehicle burglaries in a month,” said Delray Beach Police Chief Jeff Goldman in a post on Facebook after revealing there were 108 auto burglaries in the month of June alone.

Of those 108 auto burglaries in Delray Beach, 79 happened in unlocked vehicles, according to police. Goldman is urging residents to lock their doors and report suspicious activity to reduce the likelihood of future car burglaries.

The number of overall burglaries appears to be declining, although the number of auto burglaries this past month amounts to almost half of the number of burglaries in the rest of 2016, according to statistics released by the department.

  • In 2014, there were 535 auto burglaries, 53 percent of which involved unlocked vehicles.
  • In 2015, there were 433 auto burglaries, 60 percent of which involved unlocked vehicles.
  • Between January and May this year, there were 279 auto burglaries, 71 percent of which involved unlocked vehicles.

“Keep your valuables out of sight and lock your doors,” reads a poster the department is circulating online.

It continues: “Don’t be a statistic.”

VIDEO: I tried Delray police’s body cameras in ‘hostile training scenario’

Palm Beach Post reporter Lulu Ramadan (right) receives instructions from Delray Beach Police Department Training Officer Gerry Riccio at a body-worn camera training scenario at the department's Seacrest Training Center Friday, July 1, 2016. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
Palm Beach Post reporter Lulu Ramadan (right) receives instructions from Delray Beach Police Department Training Officer Gerry Riccio at a body-worn camera training scenario at the department’s Seacrest Training Center Friday, July 1, 2016. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

I’ve watched police footage in the past while trying to piece together the curious elements of an officer-involved incident.

As reporters, public records — police reports and dash, surveillance or body camera footage — are the basis of the reports we share with the public. We’re critical and we demand information, like body camera footage, to hold law enforcement accountable for their actions in the public eye.

On Friday morning, I was on the opposite end of the screen.

I tested Delray Beach Police’s new body cameras, which they rolled out that day to 20 officers. The department set up a police training scenario, in which officers played perps or bystanders and I, a former cops reporter who now covers the cities of Delray Beach and Boca Raton, played an armed officer responding to the scene.

The goal was to experience the benefits and limitations of police body cameras during a use-of-force scenario. Body cameras have gained momentum in Palm Beach County following last fall’s shooting death of Corey Jones in Palm Beach Gardens. Nouman Raja, the former officer who killed Jones and now faces criminal charges, wasn’t wearing a body camera at the time of the shooting.

Jones’ death inspired a bill approved in March by Gov. Rick Scott that doesn’t require law enforcement agencies to use cameras, but demands that policies and procedures be set for police and sheriff’s offices using the devices.

Palm Beach Post reporter Lulu Ramadan (right) participates in a training scenario while wearing a police tactical vest and body camera during a body-worn camera show and tell at the Delray Beach Police Department's Seacrest Training Center Friday, July 1, 2016. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
Palm Beach Post reporter Lulu Ramadan (right) participates in a training scenario while wearing a police tactical vest and body camera during a body-worn camera show and tell at the Delray Beach Police Department’s Seacrest Training Center Friday, July 1, 2016. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

On Friday, I strapped on a police vest, armed myself with a real handgun loaded with “soap” bullets and walked blindly into Delray Beach Police’s training complex.

The scenario: A man armed with a knife and a man armed with a gun were fighting. I was the first officer to respond without backup.

Here’s what I remember: 

» I shouted commands like, “Drop your weapons.” The men were squirming on the ground. I saw a knife. The knife was thrown across the ground. (Was it dropped?) I pointed my gun at both men while they shouted incoherently. One of them pulled out a silver hand gun and pointed it at the other man from the floor, just 5 feet from me. The unarmed man screamed, “‘He’s going to kill me.” I froze. I panicked. The armed man turned the gun and pointed it toward me. I hesitated, put my finger on the trigger, closed my eyes, turned my head and fired.

After watching the body camera footage, I learned at least four seconds had passed between my pulling the trigger and seeing the gun pointed toward me. It felt like a split-second. I begged the men to stop after seeing the gun, which I didn’t remember immediately following the scenario.

Without consciously aiming, my “soap” bullet hit the top of the armed man’s head. “Kill shot,” the officers later called it.

Here’s what I learned:

Body cameras may not tell the whole story, but they are invaluable to the public. My pounding blood and rushing adrenaline clouded my memory following the scenario. I was too shaken to speak a word afterward. (The first thing I said, in an audibly shaken voice, minutes after it ended was: “Did I kill him?”)

The footage filled in the blanks where my memory and sight couldn’t.

But, as is the case with all technology, the cameras have their limitations.

For starters, I closed my eyes and turned my head during the shot. That was captured by a camera on the sidelines, but not on the body camera. Anything going on behind me and directly to my left and right also was not captured on camera.

Overall, the experience gave me a perspective I think is necessary when working to uncover events that lead to a use-of-force incident involving law enforcement. Body cameras don’t tell the whole story, but the footage they capture gives the public much-needed, unbiased, third-party information when tragedy unfolds.

We all deserve to know what leads up to a kill shot.

6 tips to living long from a healthy 103-year-old Delray Beach hospital volunteer

Charles Carroll, a 103 year old volunteer at Delray Medical Center, celebrates his birthday with fellow volunteers, nurses and doctors. (Photo by Lulu Ramadan / Palm Beach Post)
Charles Carroll, a 103 year old volunteer at Delray Medical Center, celebrates his birthday with fellow volunteers, nurses and doctors. (Photo by Lulu Ramadan / Palm Beach Post)

When Charles Carroll walked through the waiting room of Delray Medical Center on Thursday, people whispered.

“Unbelievable,” one person said.

Another quickly replied: “What’s his secret?”

They’d overheard a nurse congratulate Carroll, whose birthday was Saturday, on turning 103 years old while he wheeled around an empty wheelchair in his teal hospital scrubs. Carroll, a volunteer at the hospital for nine years, was later surprised by a crowd in the cafeteria with cake and balloons.

“If we do this again next year, we’ll need a bigger room,” he teased as he walked through the door.

Beloved by patients, doctors and nurses alike, Carroll volunteers twice a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays at the hospital by wheeling patients to and from their rooms and assisting with bookkeeping. Despite a bout with colon cancer and a heart attack nine years ago — which inspired him to volunteer at the hospital — Carroll is fit and healthy enough to make his way around.

When patients learn his age, they’re awestruck, said Becky McCoy, director of volunteers at the medical center.

“They want to jump out of the wheelchair and wheel him around,” she joked. “They’re just amazed, as we all are.”

Caroll’s daughter, Judith Stern, one of his two children and two grandchildren, also joined in the celebration. Carroll has an aide, Stern said, but is able to get around independently and loves his work at the hospital.

Charles Carroll (in teal), a 103-year-old volunteer at Delray Medical Center, celebrates his birthday with hospital employees. (Photo by Lulu Ramadan / Palm Beach Post)
Charles Carroll (in teal), a 103-year-old volunteer at Delray Medical Center, celebrates his birthday with hospital employees. (Photo by Lulu Ramadan / Palm Beach Post)

“It gives him purpose,” Stern said. “It’s wonderful and he loves it. We all need a purpose at that age.”

And during his celebration, Carroll naturally fielded several questions burning through everyone’s minds. What are the secrets to living long and healthy?

Here are his tips:

» Do nothing in excess. “I don’t drink in excess. I don’t eat in excess. I try to have good health habits,” Carroll said.

Carroll stays on a fairly strict diet, Stern said, although he did down a decent-sized piece of birthday cake on Wednesday.

» Listen to your body to stay healthy. Much of Carroll’s health care is holistic, Stern noted. She prefers he avoid prescription medication when possible and noticed “incredible” improvements in his health following his heart attack.

Carroll spent nearly a month at Delray Medical Center recuperating from the ailment nine years ago. The visit inspired him to come back and brighten patients’ days.

» Laugh often. Carroll is constantly cracking jokes with fellow volunteers, nurses, doctors and patients. During the interview with The Palm Beach Post, he joked that he was mostly glad he still had his hair.

“He’s truly a delight to work with,” McCoy said.

» Be active and athletic while you’re young. Growing up, Carroll played hockey, baseball and golf.  Carroll is a retired army officer and a former third baseman for the University of Massachusetts baseball team.

“Of course now he can’t play sports, so he just watches them on TV,” Stern said.

» Spend time with family. Carroll attributes his longevity first to his wife, who died in 2014 at the age of 93. “I had a lovely wife,” he said, when asked about his secret to living long.

» Believe in luck. “There’s a lot of luck involved in it too,” he said. “There were a lot of people in this hospital that helped me out. I had certain problems. I never doubted that it would still work out. And here I am.”

 

Update: Fate of Delray Beach Garlic Fest up in the air until July

Executive Chef Erick Miranda, of Vic & Angelo's Restaurant, pours garlic cooked in olive oil to be emulsified making a vinaigrette while competing in the semifinals of the Garlic Chef Mystery Basket Competition in the Garlic Chef Stadium at the 14th Annual Garlic Fest in Delray Beach, Fla., Sunday, February 10, 2013. Chefs from different restaurants were given a mystery ingredient to use in preparation of a three course meal all using garlic. (Gary Coronado/The Palm Beach Post)
Executive Chef Erick Miranda, of Vic & Angelo’s Restaurant, pours garlic cooked in olive oil to be emulsified making a vinaigrette while competing in the semifinals of the Garlic Chef Mystery Basket Competition in the Garlic Chef Stadium at the 14th Annual Garlic Fest in Delray Beach, Fla., Sunday, February 10, 2013. (Gary Coronado/The Palm Beach Post)

Update at 9:40 p.m.: Garlic Fest supporters will have to wait until July to learn whether the long-running festival will be forced out of the city’s downtown.

The city commission met tonight and agreed to defer until July a vote on whether to allow the 18th annual Garlic Fest to run as scheduled in February 2017.

The commission decided more than a year ago to allow only one event per month in the city’s downtown. Garlic Fest is held in the same month as the Delray Beach Open tennis tournament, although the dates and locations do not overlap.

Commissioners have heard complaints from residents and downtown businesses about “too many and too large” events in the downtown area, said Commissioner Shelly Petrolia.

Vice-Mayor Al Jacquet agreed, adding that the issue wasn’t simply about Garlic Fest, but finding a balance in the number of events organized in the downtown to limit traffic headaches and the city’s expenses.

Deputy Vice-Mayor Jordana Jarjura and Commissioner Mitch Katz both voted to grant Garlic Fest the waiver needed hold the festival downtown in 2017, but on the condition that its coordinators would not seek the same waiver in 2018.

Ultimately, the five-member commission, absent Mayor Cary Glickstein on Tuesday night, agreed to defer the decision on Garlic Fest to the next meeting in the first week of July.

Original story: Delray Beach Garlic Fest has been a staple in the city’s downtown for more than a decade, but a commission vote tonight may change that.

The popular garlic-themed festival may be ousted from the city after a decision to limit the number the events in downtown to one per month and place stringent financial restrictions on organizers, said Nancy Stewart-Franczak, the festival’s founder.

“If they don’t want us and force us all out of town, I think they’re going to be faced with a worse reality when events head to other local cities,” Stewart-Franczak said.

She, and several fans of the festival, plan to appeal to the city commission at a meeting tonight for a waiver to allow the 18th annual Garlic Fest to run downtown in February 2017, the same month as the nationally televised Delray Beach Open tennis tournament.

The tournament and Garlic Fest don’t overlap in dates or locations, Stewart-Franczak said.

“I am very hopeful,” she said. “We’ve done a major campaign to reach out to our fans hoping for their support.”

Seventeenth Annual Delray Beach Garlic Festival Saturday January 30, 2016 at Old School Square in Delray Beach. (Bill Ingram / The Palm Beach Post)
Seventeenth Annual Delray Beach Garlic Festival Saturday January 30, 2016 at Old School Square in Delray Beach. (Bill Ingram / The Palm Beach Post)

The festival, which features live music, chef competitions, activities and, of course, garlic-based cuisine, donates proceeds to 18 different local charities and has raised more than $585,000 to date.

“Moving out of Delray is really something that I would have to look at long and hard,” Stewart-Franczak said. “This isn’t about producing a Garlic Fest, it’s about being a part of our community and giving back to our local nonprofits.”

The limit on the number of festivals and new financial guidelines are part of the city’s effort to restrict the number of road closures downtown and ensure the city recoups any losses.

In anticipation of the city rejecting Garlic Fest’s waiver, the organizers are seeking out other venues, like the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens west of Delray. Stewart-Franczak appealed to the Palm Beach County Commission for appropriate approvals to have the event at Morikami.

Though, no venues organizers have sought out so far have the appropriate infrastructure, such as hotels and parking, Stewart-Franczak said.

New Jersey-based make-your-own-pizza eateries to open in Delray, west Boca

Contributed: 1000 Degrees Neapolitan Pizza
Contributed: 1000 Degrees Neapolitan Pizza

Looking for a quick and cheap personalized pizza pie? Well, 1000 Degrees Neapolitan Pizza is opening two locations west of Boca Raton and in Delray Beach in the coming months.

The New Jersey-based fast-casual pizza restaurant will open its west Boca location, at Shadowwood Square on Glades Road west of State Road 7, sometime in August, and its Delray Beach location, on Federal Highway at Linton Boulevard in the plaza with Trader Joe’s, in September, said Nick Anagno, one of the restaurants’ two franchisees.

“The concept is really great,” Agnano said. “It’s a build-your-own customized pizza with unlimited toppings for a set price.”

The restaurant will offer a build-your-own 10-inch pizza cooked in 2 minutes for $8.95. A 14-inch personalized pie is $16.95.

Contributed: 1000 Degrees Neapolitan Pizza
Contributed: 1000 Degrees Neapolitan Pizza

The chain is similar to Blaze Fast-Fire’d Pizza restaurant in Boca Raton on Federal Highway north of 20th Street, which opened last year.

1000 Degrees Neapolitan Pizza is the third fast-casual pizza restaurant to set its sights on Palm Beach County.

Although no grand opening dates have been set, both locations will offer free pizza to all customers throughout the day of grand opening, Angano said. The first 10 people at each location will get free pizza for a year.

The grand opening dates will be released in late July.

 

 

Delray Beach approves county’s bid to bring Davis Cup tennis to city

DELRAY BEACH - After his Davis Cup match in 2004, Andy Roddick of the US team spends some time signing autographs for fans who reach out to him from the grandstand. Photo by Damon Higgins/The Palm Beach
DELRAY BEACH – After his Davis Cup match in 2004, Andy Roddick of the US team spends some time signing autographs for fans who reach out to him from the grandstand. Photo by Damon Higgins/The Palm Beach

Delray Beach approved a plan to bid on bringing the semifinals of the international Davis Cup tennis tournament to the city in September, with the hope that it will bring with it a $1 million economic impact.

At least 18,000 people from some of the 125 nations that participate in the tournament would be expected to attend the three-day event were it to be hosted at the Delray Beach Tennis Center, said George Linley, executive director of the Palm Beach County Sports Commission. The bulk of the economic boost would go toward Delray businesses.

On Tuesday evening, the city commission unanimously approved the plan to submit a bid to the United States Tennis Association — pending an OK from the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency which would put up $140,000 towards the bid. The city would offer the stadium rent-free, along with maintenance and police protection which would cost more than $100,000.

The city hosted an opening round match for the Davis Cup in 2004 at the Delray Beach Tennis Center, which seats 8,200. The 2004 match sold out the center and generated $35,000 in sponsorship, according to archived Palm Beach Post articles. The city has never hosted semifinals of the tournament, Linley said.

DELRAY BEACH - A quickly-gathering crowd swelters under the afternoon sun as they wait to gain admission into the Delray Beach Stadium and Tennis Center for the Davis Cup quarterfinals and the match between Mardy Fish for the US and Jonas Bjorkman for Sweden Friday, April 9, 2004. Staff photo by Chris Matula
DELRAY BEACH – A quickly-gathering crowd swelters under the afternoon sun as they wait to gain admission into the Delray Beach Stadium and Tennis Center for the Davis Cup quarterfinals and the match between Mardy Fish for the US and Jonas Bjorkman for Sweden Friday, April 9, 2004. Staff photo by Chris Matula

“This would be a history-making event for our community,” he told the commission Tuesday.

In order to host the semifinals in the United States, the American team must make it past the quarterfinals by beating out Croatia on July 15. The team would then play either Czech Republic or France in the semifinals, on Sept. 16 through Sept. 18.

“It’s the perfect time for our hospitality industry… September is the slowest of the summer months,” Linley said.

The event is broadcast live on the Tennis Channel in up to 50 countries. Additionally, highlight videos of the tournament distribute to 140 countries, giving the Delray tennis center a shot at major exposure, Linley said.

It isn’t clear yet what other cities would be making bids, or what the odds are that Delray Beach would land the tournament.

Two 3-D exhibits to open this weekend at Morikami Museum in Delray Beach

Artist Hiromi Mizugai Moneyhun displays works for a three-dimmensional exhibit on display at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens beginning June 10. (Contributed)
Artist Hiromi Mizugai Moneyhun displays works for a three-dimmensional exhibit on display at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens beginning June 10. (Contributed)

Three-dimensional cut paper pieces and bamboo sculptures are among the works that will go on display at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens this weekend as part of the museum’s two latest exhibits.

The exhibits, titled “Shadows of the Floating World: Papercuts by Hiromi Moneyhun” and “Transcending Forms: Japanese Bamboo Baskets,” will be open to the public June 10 through Sept. 18.

The first features works made from paper that combine traditional Japanese art forms with contemporary graphic illustration, according to a statement from the museum. The artist, Hiromi Mizugai Moneyhun, explores cultural perceptions of women in Japanese society and other cultures in her works.

A bamboo sculpture is one of many bamboo works that will be on display in the latest exhibit at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach beginning June 10. (Contributed)
A bamboo sculpture is one of many bamboo works that will be on display in the latest exhibit at Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach beginning June 10. (Contributed)

The second exhibit features a collection of works created by bamboo artists of the 20th and 21st centuries and earlier bamboo baskets created for practical purposes. The exhibit will trace the evolution of the bamboo basket, a staple of Japanese culture for centuries, from its humble beginnings to artistic adaptations by avant-garde artists.

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens is open Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $15. The museum is at 4000 Morikami Park Road, Delray Beach.

 

One of four gnomes in Delray Beach museum installation stolen, museum says

Four colorful gnomes were once bolted to a pedestal outside Cornell Art Museum in Delray Beach in an installation by New York-based artist Sam Tufnell. The blue gnome went missing overnight Thursday, June 2, 2016. (Contributed)
Four colorful gnomes were once bolted to a pedestal outside Cornell Art Museum in Delray Beach in an installation by New York-based artist Sam Tufnell. The blue gnome went missing overnight Thursday, June 2, 2016. (Contributed)

A bright-blue garden gnome, one of four once perched on a pedestal outside the Cornell Art Museum in Delray Beach, is missing in what the museum is describing as a “gnome-napping.”

The 35-inch gnome is part of a contemporary exhibit called “Lit” on display at the museum until Aug. 28. The blue gnome, once bolted to a pedestal outside the museum, was taken overnight Thursday, said New York-based artist Sam Tufnell, one of 16 featured in the exhibit.

“It’s unfortunate, that was a one-of-a-kind gnome in that color,” Tufnell said. The museum is offering a $500 reward for the safe return of the gnome, according to Cornell’s Instagram account.

Since the theft, the museum has taken down the three remaining gnomes, leaving only the pedestal outside in the exhibit’s only outdoor work. They plan to replace the stolen gnome once they have a “more permanent” method of securing all of them, Tufnell said.

“Ultimately I’m not sure if it’s an act of appreciation or absolute hatred, but we would very much like for the gnome to be returned and be reunited with the series,” Tufnell said.

(Contributed)
(Contributed)

The gnomes are made from resin with added pigments to appear vivid in color. Inside the museum, more of Tufnell’s works are scattered throughout the exhibit. “Lit,” which opened in late April, pulled together pieces by artists who incorporate light into different forms of artwork.

Tufnell adds an element of humor to his work by making molds of commonplace objects, recreating them with resin and either keeping them clear or adding bright color, he said.

“Contemporary art and high art can be a bit serious and overwhelming for viewers,” he said. “I think art should be about things you find in your everyday experiences.”

Anyone with information about the missing gnome is asked to contact the museum at (561) 243-7922.

The museum’s exhibit hours are from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Admission is a suggested $5 donation. The museum is at 51 N. Swinton Ave.

 

Residents of apartment managed by Corey Jones: ‘People want some answers’

Corey Jones. Photo provided by Family of Corey Jones.
Corey Jones. Photo provided by Family of Corey Jones.

The residents at the La France Apartments in Delray Beach, where Corey Jones worked, said Wednesday afternoon they heard about the state attorney’s decision to send the fatal shooting case to the grand jury, and hope that brings the popular drummer justice.

“If that’s the way they have to go, that’s the way they have to go. But he does deserve justice because he was a good kid,” said Lawrence Washington, 74.

Read more about the decision here: Story

Washington said he knew Jones for about four years and described him as a “busy man” who “kept the place up.”

Jones managed the complex on Northwest Fourth Avenue for the Delray Beach Housing Authority.

“He was a very good kid. He always knocked on my door and said ‘Mr. Washington, is there anything I can help you with?'” Washington said.

Resident Ernest McCloud said he’s pleased the case is going to the grand jury because “people want some answers.”