Group rallies in Delray Beach for awareness of Dakota Access pipeline controversy

Suki Dejong, of Boynton Beach, was one of a handful of protesters who held signs at the corner of Swinton and Atlantic avenues on Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2016 to raise awareness about the Dakota Access pipeline controversy. (Photo by Lulu Ramadan / Palm Beach Post)

Suki Dejong, of Boynton Beach, was one of a handful of protesters who held signs at the corner of Swinton and Atlantic avenues on Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2016 to raise awareness about the Dakota Access pipeline controversy. (Photo by Lulu Ramadan / Palm Beach Post)

DELRAY BEACH — “No more broken promises,” reads a blue and red sign held up by Ann Fonfa, of Delray Beach.

She and a handful of others gathered Tuesday evening at the corner of Swinton and Atlantic avenues to bring attention to the Dakota Access pipeline, a $3.8 billion, 1,170-mile oil pipeline whose charted path is just north of Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s reservation, prompting protests in that area. Several Palm Beach County residents gathered Tuesday “in solidarity with the Native American people” in North Dakota, said Joni Albrecht, organizer of the rally.

“There’s a lot that people don’t pay attention to and a lot that isn’t in the news,” Albrecht said, as passersby honked their horns in support of the assembly, just outside Old School Square. The group also handed out fliers that warned of the pipeline’s potential to damage the water supply and Native American cultural sites to passing pedestrians.

The federal government on Friday temporarily suspended construction of the pipeline after thousands of activists protested the project. The head of a Texas company building the Dakota Access pipeline said Tuesday that it is committed to the project despite opposition.

Ann Fonfa, of Delray Beach, holds a sign at the corner of Swinton and Atlantic avenues to raise awareness about the Dakota Access pipeline controversy. (Photo by Lulu Ramadan / Palm Beach Post)

Ann Fonfa, of Delray Beach, holds a sign at the corner of Swinton and Atlantic avenues to raise awareness about the Dakota Access pipeline controversy. (Photo by Lulu Ramadan / Palm Beach Post)

Marilyn Egan, a Nebraska-native who has lived in Delray Beach for 20 years, said it was important gather on Tuesday, even from thousands of miles away.

“I think if everyone came out everywhere, we could make a difference,” Egan, 67, said. “You cannot diminish a person’s responsibility to keep our environment and our government intact.”